Archive for the ‘29th Sunday’ Category

The Secret of Greatness 10-21-2018

Saturday, October 20th, 2018

We see on T.V. many special award shows, the Emmy’s, the Grammy’s, the Oscar’s, the Espy’s, you can name more of them. Our Gospel challenges us to reflect on a different kind of awards presentation. Our show is entitled – The Secret of Greatness.
When Doug Meland and his wife moved into a village of Brazil’s Fulnio Indians, he was referred to as “the white man,” an uncomplimentary term. Other white men had exploited the villagers, burned their homes, and robbed their lands. But after the missionaries learned the language and began to help people with medicine and in other ways, they began to call Doug, “the good white man.” And when the Melands began adopting the customs of the people, the Fulnio spoke of Doug as the “white Indian.”
Then one day, as Doug was washing the dirty, blood-caked foot of an injured boy, he heard a bystander say, “Who ever heard of a white man washing an Indian’s foot? Certainly this man is from God.” From that day, whenever Doug entered an Indian home, it would be announced, “Here comes the man God sent us.”
The Secret of Greatness.
Eighty-year-old Clara Hale has served as foster mother to over 500 babies born to drug-addicted mothers. She cares for them until their own mothers can do so. These babies enter life with a drug dependency themselves. That makes “Mama” Hale’s job harder. “When a baby is crying for a drug,” she says, “all I can do is hold it close and say to it, ‘I love you, and God loves you, and your mama loves you. Your mama just needs a little more time.’”
The Secret of Greatness.
John Penne is a retired businessman. He and his wife developed cancer at the same time. His wife died, but John lived; and his cancer went into remission.
While driving back and forth from the hospital for regular treatment, John noticed the number of sick people waiting at the hospital’s bus stop.

Sometimes the weather was bitter cold and these people, many of them elderly, were obviously in pain. John went to the local chapter of the American Cancer Society and said, “Give me a car and a little gas money, and I’ll volunteer my days driving these unfortunate people home.”
For ten years now, John has donated his time doing just that.
The Secret of Greatness.
After graduating from Georgetown University, Anne Donahue volunteered a year of her life to work at Covenant House in New York City.
Every night at ten o’clock Anne and another volunteer put gallons of hot chocolate and bags of sandwiches into the Covenant House van.
For the next couple of hours, the familiar van with a dove painted on its door tours the city’s juvenile prostitution areas.
Anne explains the reason behind the tour. “We’re out there because we know that a lot of kids haven’t tried Covenant House yet. About two-thirds have never heard of us.”

Anne goes on to say that they accomplish something else, too. They show kids that somebody truly cares, that somebody’s out there who’s not interested in buying or selling them. After her first year as a volunteer, Anne said: “I was very depressed. What kind of God would let kids suffer so much? … Finally it got to me…God’s not going to come down and show us his love. We have to let God’s love work through us.”
The Secret of Greatness.
In reading a review of this unique awards presentation — a certain reviewer – by the name of Jesus had this to say:
“To the winners — Well Done — Good and Faithful Servant”
I wonder, what will Jesus say to us?

Give To God What is God’s! 10-22-2017

Sunday, October 22nd, 2017

A man walked into a rooftop bar and ordered a drink. The man
next to him began a conversation about the unique wind currents in the
area. The first man said he didn’t understand what was so special about
the wind there, so the other said, “Let me show you.” With that he went
to the window, jumped out, did a spin in mid-air, and then came back in.
“See how great the currents are! You can do the same thing.”
After a few more drinks and much prodding, the first man decided
to test the wind currents. He went to the window, jumped out, and
dropped like a rock. The bartender looked at the other man and said,
“Superman, you’re really mean when you’re drunk.
Most of us are neither mean nor a drunk – I hope – but is that
enough? Is just staying out of trouble and avoiding nastiness enough to
make a life? It’s a start, but it’s not nearly enough. So what is enough?
Jesus gave us a clue in today’s gospel. His enemies were trying to
entrap him into an offense. But he just brushed them off, “Give to
Caesar what is Caesar’s.” And then he returned to his core message, but give to God what is God’s.”
So, what do we have that is God’s? Very simply, our life. But how
do we give that back to God? By becoming nuns or priests or martyrs or
missionaries in darkest Africa, or perhaps throwing ourselves on a live
grenade to save our friends? For most of us that is not what God wants.
What God does want from all of us is for us to learn to use our life the
way God uses life: by helping those who need help and giving life to
those who need life. So how do we begin? The key is by being alert and
paying attention to one another, and developing the deeply ingrained
habit of asking ourselves: How’s he doing? What does she need? Is he
OK? How can I help her?
Most of the time most of what people really need is within our
power to give. For example, some of us are getting a little forgetful, and
what we need is just a little reassurance – and a little patience. And for
all of us there are those days when nothing is right. Most times a friend
is all that’s needed to lift the fog.
And think about the times someone has been very bad, and needs
to say so, but doesn’t know how. A dose of encouragement from an understanding friend will light the way and draw him out of the dark. At
any given moment most of what is needed by the people right around us
is within our power to give. And better yet, all we have to handle – all
we have to give – is one moment at a time: If we take care of the
minutes, God will take care of the days – and the years.
God has given us the gifts of life, and the power to give life to one
another – in many shapes and sizes – every day. We can be real
supermen and real wonder women if we learn how to give our gift, if we
learn to pay attention to one another, see what is needed, and give what
is needed – one moment at a time. From such humble stuff the kingdom
of God is made.